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3 deadly sins organisations commit that kills customer experience

Written by: Vivek Jaiswal | Co-founder, Customer Guru

Why do only a handful of brands create memorable customer experience while others are forgotten?

Apple, Enterprise, Amazon, and Zappos. These names are synonymous to customer loyalty and, above all, ‘memorable’ customer experience. In her recent article on Forbes, Blake Morgan writes about how companies should focus on creating memorable customer experiences. I couldn’t agree more: in a world where consumers are bombarded with catch-word advertising and companies are spending billions on marketing, only a handful brands are able to create unforgettable experiences. What is it that others fail to do?

Here are, what I think, the three deadly sins that organisations are committing that is killing their customer experience:

1. Not hiring the right people

The first step in building a customer centric company culture is to hire the right people. Customer facing employees who are more concerned about being right than about fixing a customer’s problem will never leave a customer happy when something goes wrong. There will be times when your employees would make a mistake, but if they can’t admit it then you don’t need them. Being service oriented and customer centric is an attitude; look for the right attitude over right skills when hiring.

2. Not investing in creating exceptional customer experience

Marketing budgets are better spent on creating exceptional customer experience than on advertising or social media campaigns. We wrote several amazingly shocking customer experience stories about how Flipkart went out of its way to deliver a book to Rajagopal Natarajan, so he could read it on his day long train ride; and about United Airlines delaying a connecting flight, so Kerry Drake could meet his dying mother for a final goodbye. Such stories are far more valuable and memorable than any other marketing campaign. Creating exceptional customer experience gets you more customers who are already willing to buy more from you.

3. Not being serious about customer experience

If you are serious about improving customer experience, make someone accountable for it. If not, just introduce a metric like NPS®, CSE, CSI or AMTPFT (Another Metric That People Forget with Time) and whip your management team in the quarterly review meetings as to why these metrics are not going up! More companies are creating customer experience officers who are accountable for day-to-day focus on customer experience. Having such a ‘Chief Customer Experience Officer’ will show that the organisation is super serious about customer experience and encourage employees to follow suit.

Achieving your customer experience goals is a journey with hundreds of right and wrong steps. Be willing to correct course if you are on the wrong path.

Would love to hear about your thoughts and feedback in the comment below.